Course Descriptions

Please note that not all courses are offered every quarter.
To see current and upcoming courses, please check the schedule:

Course Information

Click on the course to see a description and past syllabi.

BUS_INST 301 (formerly BUS_INST 260)

Accounting

BUS_INST 302 (formerly BUS_INST 239)

Marketing Management

BUS_INST 303

Leadership in Organizations

BUS_INST 304

Corporate Finance

BUS_INST 321

Business & Economic Institutions in Historical Perspective

BUS_INST 394

Professional Linkage Seminar

 


BUS_INST 301 (formerly BUS_INST 260)

Accounting

 

Introductory course in accounting, covering both financial and managerial accounting. 
Students learn to use the financial statements of an organization for making decisions. 
Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202.

Past Syllabi:

BUS_INST 260 – Accounting & Business Finance – 2016 - Winter – Robin Soffer

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BUS_INST 302 (formerly BUS_INST 239)

Marketing Management

 

Basic principles and applications of marketing management. 
Marketing segmentation, target marketing, brand positioning, consumer behavior, channels strategy, pricing, advertising and promotion. 
Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202. 

Past Syllabi:

BUS_INST 239 – Marketing Management – 2015 - Winter – Ginger Pennington

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BUS_INST 303

Leadership in Organizations

 

Social science tools for solving organizational problems and influencing individuals, groups and organizations. 
Competitive decision-making, reward system design, team building, strategic negotiation, political dynamics corporate culture and strategic organizational design. 
Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202. 

Past Syllabi:

New Course - Past Syllabi Not Yet Available

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BUS_INST 304

Corporate Finance

 

Effects of time and uncertainty on valuation and decision-making. 
Discounting techniques, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, firm valuation, capital asset pricing model, financial options. 
Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202, STAT 210 or equivalent, MATH 212 or 220, BUS INST 301

*Should not be taken by students who have taken ECON 360-1, IEMS 326, or KELLG FE 310.
(Students may substitute any of ECON 360-1, IEMS 326 and KELLG FE for BUS INST 304.)

Past Syllabi:

New Course - Past Syllabi Not Yet Available

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BUS_INST 321

Business and Economic Institutions in Historical Perspective

 

Factors affecting economic growth and challenges that economies face to achieve economic success. 
The organization of firms and financial markets, corporate governance, innovation, financial crises, income inequality, race and gender.  
Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202, STAT 210 or equivalent, MATH 212 or 220.

Past Syllabi:

New Course - Past Syllabi Not Yet Available

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BUS_INST 394

Professional Linkage Seminar

 
Content varies. 
Possible topics include entrepreneurship, investment banking, business ethics, global marketing, sports marketing and non-profit management. 
Up to 1 professional linkage seminar or internship related course (CFS 393-1 or CFS-395-1) may count toward the minor as a humanities or social science elective.
Prerequisites may vary. 
The following is a list of some currently offered and/or recently offered professional linkage seminars. 
Students should check the annual course schedule to determine the precise quarter(s) in which particular seminars are offered.
  • Entrepreneurship
    • This class will not give you everything you need to run out and start your first business. However, it will attempt to expose you to many of the critical elements to becoming a successful entrepreneur.
      Starting a business is difficult, all-consuming and the odds are against you. This class will also be difficult, time consuming and certainly not a cake-walk. For those of you considering starting your own business or going into a related field it might just be one of the most valuable classes you can take...
      We will explore many aspects of new ventures including: evaluating business ideas, the value proposition, writing the business plan, financial modeling, customer acquisition, fund raising, presenting your business plan, picking your management team, structure and capitalization, legal protection (patents, trademarks NDAs, etc.)
      This class is being modeled after Entrepreneurship 462 which is offered at Kellogg Many of the speakers will be the same speakers that present in the class at Kellogg and the workload will be similar to that of a Kellogg class. THIS IS NOT GOING TO BE EASY! But if you are dedicated and put the effort in, you will get many times that back in a fun, engaging class that is taught from the perspective of the business world, not the perspective of the classroom.
  • Ethics and Leadership
    • Leadership, Ethics, and You Who is a leader? What exactly is leadership? Is it someone beautiful, articulate, and oozing with charisma, with a silver tongue that can tame even the most curmudgeonly? Is it a life filled with glamour, glory, adulation, and riches? Or is it perhaps a different journey? Are leaders born or can such qualities be developed? What is the difference between a Lincoln and a Mao, or a Churchill and a Stalin, or a Gandhi and a Hitler, or even Sam Walton and Jeff Skilling? What exactly is ethics and does it have a role in leadership? Is "everyone does it" the basic mantra of life or is there, perhaps, another road? We will wrestle with these kinds of questions. The learning will come mainly from classroom discussions, team presentations, individual papers, and significant reading. Finally, you will need to look within for answers, especially to the question: What kind of a leader do I plan to be?
      "It is not the mountain we conquer, but ourselves." - Sir Edmund Hillary
  • History of Investing
    • The goal of the course is to provide an overview of the history of investment thought, looking at ancient times and studying modern investment thinking more closely. We will also survey a number of the major investment categories with a focus on how investing takes place in the "real world."
  • Investment Banking
    • This course focuses on investment banking organizational structure, products, risks, earnings, regulations, innovations and competition.  The functions of the “banking” business (M&A and financing, including equity, bonds and convertibles), the “sales and trading” business (client-related sales and trading and proprietary trading) and other investment banking businesses will be analyzed.  In addition, new, innovative Wall Street securities and advisory products will be reviewed.  Finally, investment banking relationships with private equity funds, hedge funds and corporate and institutional clients will be explored.
  • Non-Profit Management (campusCatalyst)
    • This course is jointly sponsored by Business Institutions and a student organization called campusCatalyst.  The course is taught by a leader in the Chicagoland non-profit community and combines both a consulting experience with area non-profits facing organizational strategy issues with classroom lectures and discussions on the nonprofit sector.  The class is composed of 25 students who are split into teams of five, and matched with local non-profit organizations and Kellogg MBA mentors, to work on quarter-long consulting engagements.  Students directly engage with their client organizations in the field and then collectively meet once per week to discuss issues and problems they are facing with one another and their instructor, as well as to attend a series of classroom lectures on the nonprofit sector.  To inform and guide students’ interactions with non-profits, the classroom sessions will provide an overview of the non-profit sector and the growing trends towards greater accountability, transparency and performance management.  Students will explore the changing roles and responsibilities of non-profits, as shaped by both the public and private sector, and they will examine the implications of these trends.  The course curriculum has two parts: 1) introducing students to the so-called Third Sector and the present political and economic systems that influence how it serves the public good and 2) examining business strategy and management and their applicability to non-profits.  The over-arching goal of the course is to create a foundation of knowledge from which students can draw upon as they work together with community non-profits.  This course is an opportunity to innovate, collaborate, learn and apply a new set of skills and knowledge while impacting the community.
    • Students must apply to take this course. 
      Information about application deadlines for future quarters and how to apply as well as more information about campusCatalyst can be found at: campuscatalystnu.org.
  • Positive Entrepreneurship
    • The goal of this course is to help motivate you to start or work for a company that helps you live to your full potential in life, both professionally and personally. Students today are seeking to find meaningful work with companies that have a mission, culture, and values that align with their own. This class is the start of the student’s journey to find meaning and true passion in their work and personal life.
      The class will take you from where you are today (your story, strengths and values) and through your goals and aspirations help you to reach your potential and become the person you want to be.  My hope is that through passion and persistence you will be able to live the life you visualize in this class.  Positive Entrepreneurship is a class that will teach you the skills and knowledge of realistic optimism and a flourishing life illustrated by real world examples of successful entrepreneurs who have achieved professional and personal success.
  • Theories of Financial Investing
    • This course studies the field of investment management for institutional portfolios. It is intended as a combination of modern financial theory and industry practice, giving insight into the investment process used in large foundations, endowments, and pension funds. It covers best practices in risk management, diversification theory, modern portfolio theory, and new issues in investment management. In particular, the field of alternative investments namely, hedge funds, private equity, venture capital, and real asset-based investments will be featured.

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